Tag Archives: SFSU

Pluralities Nonfiction Film Conference Full Schedule

***Announcement***

Join us NOV 8th and 9th at San Francisco State University for an exciting line-up of filmmakers, researchers, performance, VR, and discussion about all things nonfiction. We welcome Kim Nelson and her team from University of Windsor in Canada with their live doc project 130 Year Road Trip, Kelly Gallagher from Antioch College with panels and workshops on animation and resistance, Jason Fox from Princeton University to discuss his World Records journal published by Union Docs and presenters from across the Bay Area and beyond including a niche distribution panel with Susie Hernandez from KQED, Daniel Moretti of Frameline, Masashi Niwano with CAAM and producer Marc Smolowitz and the Munduruku VR Amazon experience created by Alchemy VR with Greenpeace.

Check out the full schedule. Attendance is FREE.

LOCATION: SEVEN HILLS CONFERENCE CENTER at SFSU

Register for your FREE tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pluralities-tickets-38158856166

FEATURED GUESTS

Kelly Gallagher is an experimental animator, filmmaker and Assistant Professor of Media Arts at Antioch College in Ohio. Her theoretical work investigates the radical and feminist possibilities of experimental animation. Her animations, experimental films and documentaries have screened internationally at venues including: Ann Arbor Film Festival, London ICA Artists’ Biennial, LA Film Forum, Alchemy Film and Moving Image Festival, Traverse City Film Festival, and Anthology Film Archives. She is the recipient of the Ivan Kaljević Award from Alternative Film/Video Festival Belgrade, the Helen Hill Award from Indie Grits, the Audience Award from Brazil’s Fronteira Film Festival, and the Jury’s Choice Award from Black Maria Film Festival.

Kim Nelson is the Director of the Humanities Research Group and an Associate Professor in the School of Creative Arts at the University of Windsor in Canada. Her work has been funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Ontario Arts Council, the Windsor Endowment for the Arts and have screened at international film festivals and on university campuses in Canada, the US and Europe, as well as online with KCET in the US. Kim has held fellowships in Germany, Canada, and the US, and she has been a board member and programmer at the Windsor International Film Festival since 2010. Her current interest is in conceptualizing and creating live participatory cinema as an alternative future for screen culture.

Jason Fox is a filmmaker and lecturer at Princeton University. He has taught in the Graduate School of Cinema Studies at New York University, Vassar College, and Cooper Union. His award-winning work as a director, cinematographer, and editor has screened internationally in film festivals including Sundance, AFI Fest, and Venice, on broadcast television, and in gallery installation settings.  He has worked as a film programmer in conjunction with The American Museum of Natural History, The Flaherty Seminar, and the Museum of Modern Art, among other venues. He is a recipient of a Union Square Award for social justice, and he is also the founding editor of the peer-reviewed journal of documentary studies, World Records, published by UnionDocs in Brooklyn, NY.

CONFERENCE SCHEDULE – NOVEMBER 8th & 9th

Nov 8th & 9th – All Day

An Immersive VR Experience: Munduruku: The Fight to Defend the Heart of the Amazon

Combining cutting-edge Virtual Reality filmmaking and multisensory storytelling, Munduruku opens a window into the lives, stories and struggle of the Munduruku Indigenous People in the heart of the Amazon rainforest.

Wednesday, Nov 8th

9:00am: Coffee/Tea – All are welcome

9:10am-10:45am: In Resistance with Filmmaker Scholars

  • Kelly Gallagher (Antioch College): Animation as Power and Protest (working title)
  • Alexander Johnston (UC Santa Cruz): Evidence of Evidence
  • Kevin Pina (CSU, East Bay): Documenting Dissent

11:00am-12:00pm: Identity: Constructed, Deconstructed

  • Yuriko Romer (Independent Filmmaker): Diamond Diplomacy
  • Talena Sanders (Sonoma State University): Prospector
  • Nyssa Chow (Columbia University, NY): Still Life, A Digital Book

1:00pm-2:00pm: Consequences of Historical Rendering and Technology

  • Kim Nelson: Constructing a Historiophoty for/in the Digital Sublunar
  • Rob Nelson: Whether you Win or Lose, Bombing Civilians is Complicated: Strategies of Explanation in the Canadian and German Documentaries ‘Death by Moonlight’ (1992) and ‘Der Feuersturm’ (2003)

(Both from University of Windsor, Canada)

2:15pm-3:45pm: Innovation & Scholarship in Nonfiction Media Journals

  • Jason Fox: The Documentary Camera and World Records Journal, Princeton University
  • Alexander Johnston: Now!  Journal of Urgent Praxis
  • Soumyaa K. Behrens: Pluralities Journal, Documentary Film Institute
  • Kelly Gallagher: Now!  Journal of Urgent Praxis

3:45pm-4:15pm: Short Reception – Everyone welcome to attend

4:15pm-5:45pm: Emergent Stories: How Niche and Diaspora Films Impact Smaller Communities

  • Susie Hernandez from KQED
  • Masashi Niwano from Center for Asian American Media
  • Daniel Moretti from Frameline
  • Marc Smolowitz Independent Producer, 13th Gen

Thursday, Nov 9th

8:00am: Coffee/Tea – Everyone welcome to attend

8:20am-9:25am: Politics, Activism and Visibility in Golden Gate and Gezi Parks*

  • Cahal McLaughlin (Queens University Belfast): Introduction
  • Şirin Fulya Erensoy (Istanbul Kültür University): Documenting Injustice in a Time of Media Blackout
  • Soumyaa K. Behrens (SFSU): Nail House: Political Gentrification in San Francisco

* This panel is in collaboration with the Center for Documentary Research Conference at Queens University and will be conducted live and via Skype.

9:30am-11:00am: Small Hands-On Workshop with Kelly Gallagher

11:00am-12:20pm: Agency in Nonfiction: To Tell One’s Own Stories

  • Harjant Gill (Towson University): Exploring South Asian Masculinities Through Ethnographic Film
  • Emily Beitiks (SFSU): Documenting Disability
  • Aaron Dickinson Sachs (St. Mary’s College) & John Drew (Adelphi University): Cacao Stories, A Food Manifesto

2:10pm-3:45pm: 130 Year Road Trip (Performance, Live Documentary)

  • Kim Nelson, Rob Nelson, Lana Oppen, Brent Lee (University of Windsor)

3:45pm-5pm: Reception – All are welcome

7:30pm: Screening of Kelly Gallagher’s films at Artists Television Access

#pluralities #docfilminstitute #nonfiction #sfsu #130yearroadtrip #animateddocs #scholarfilmmaker #researchpractitioner #documentarydisrupted

Summer Screenings!

ABINA and THE IMPORTANT MEN

Mark your calendars for Doc Film’s summer screenings!  We are honored and excited to be included in the SF Black Film Festival!  Our animated feature, Abina and The Important Men, is an official selection of this year’s program.  The film screens at the beautiful Koret Auditorium in the deYoung Museum on June 16th at 6pm with Q/A and reception to follow.  Tickets for this event are free to encourage as many community members to attend as possible.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/6pm-8pm-friday-koret-auditorium-de-young-museum-50-hagiwara-tea-garden-dr-tickets-34923927407

Abina tells the story of a young enslaved woman in Africa who takes her master to court under British Rule in the late 1800’s.  It is adapted from a graphic novel of the same name, authored by historian Trevor Getz and illustrated by Liz Clarke.  The book is based on Abina’s actual court transcripts and was awarded the James Harvey Robinson prize.  The film is voiced by students, faculty and staff of SFSU representing Theatre, Cinema, Music, Ethnic Studies, Design & Industry, History, Administration and the Associated Students Inc.

Check out the trailer, too!

 

CON MOTO: The Alexander String Quartet

Later this summer, get your groove on with our Television premiere of Con Moto: The Alexander String Quartet.  The film has screened at international festivals and airs on KQED’s Truly CA series on August 18th at 8pm.   Mark your calendars!

Con Moto follows the world-class musicians on the road in Poland as they play Beethoven and share their talents and legacy with Polish audiences.

Written by, Soumyaa K. Behrens

Barbara Hammer & Cheryl Dunye in Conversation

The legacy of the SFSU School of Cinema is nothing short of remarkable.  In our most recent forum, we had the opportunity to indulge in that history with film pioneer, Barbara Hammer, alumna and renegade of the Cinema program.  The juicy dialogue led by another SFSU Cinema phenom, Cheryl Dunye, wrapped up Hammer’s visit to campus and master class with aspiring graduate and undergraduate students in the program.

docfilm forum title card

Students take part in the conversation, populating the studio audience and posing questions to Hammer and Dunye that are interesting and provocative.  Hammer and Dunye give generously of themselves and share their past experiences with incredible candor.  They don advice on shooting those intimate love scenes, share moments of questioning their own work and desires and ultimately land on the most important tool each one has to create and continue creating.  For Barbara, it was the Hammer and for Cheryl it was the Dun and the Ye.  All they need is all they have.  The uniqueness of their beings and the courage to reckon with themselves is what they rely upon – and that is all any artist needs to achieve her vision.

It was a delicious afternoon for all who were there.  But, if you weren’t, take a look at how it went down.

Barbara Hammer’s visit to SFSU was co-sponsored by The School of Cinema, The School of Art, Queer Cinema Institute, Documentary Film Institute and the College of Liberal & Creative Arts.  Hammer presented her new film, Welcome To This House to the SFSU community and general public.  She held a master class with graduate and undergraduate students in the School of Cinema and visited classes to view student work.  She was honored with the inaugural Barbara Hammer scholarship presented by the Queer Cinema Institute and won by John Edward Serafica (former DocFilm Intern Extraordinaire)

Written By Soumyaa K. Behrens

Be A Green Gator: #SustainableSFSU

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Hey Gators, ever wonder where your trash goes after you throw it away? Be a Green Gator is an informative video that shows the lifecycle of your trash, recycle, and compost at SFSU. Waste management is crucial knowledge because throwing away trash has huge impacts on our global environment. For a healthy environment, it is important to know what trash bins to use to dispose your waste. Click the link for more information on correct Trash Bin Usage and share the video with other SF State students for a #SustainableSFSU

This project was developed through the Emerging Leaders Program at San Francisco State University.  DocFilm DIrector, Soumyaa Behrens graduated from the program and helped expand composting, green procurement and education surrounding the three bin system along with team members: Constance Cavallas, Caitlin Steele, Dylan Mooney, Jonathan Foerster, David Chelliah, Megan Dobbyn and Peter Le.

The animation was a collaborative effort by the DocFilm team and student assistants Daewon Kim and Kylie Pisciotto.

#SFSU #Docfilm #Trashbinusage #Wastemanagement #Greengator #Recycle #Compost #Trash

#EmergingLeaders #SustainableSFSU

DocFilm and Poetry Center collaborate to Archive Readings

Eight Occasions, September–October 2015, Part 1

“I think we can… you can sort of talk generally about the forms of life: birth and death, and need for sustenance, and language, and breathing and all that. But nobody has the right to say how it is for anybody else. That’s a luxury that no one has.”

Paul Ebenkamp, October 1, 2015

The first eight Poetry Center programs that took place this Fall 2015 are each now available as professionally recorded streaming video documents (with downloadable audio files) at Poetry Center Digital Archive. This is the first time in the 62-year history of The Poetry Center that we’ve been able to make what we do so readily available to people beyond the live audience, present in the room. The work is posted online quickly, it can be seen and/or heard by anyone on the planet with an internet connection, it comes at no direct cost to the viewer, and it looks and sounds great.

Here’s how our new archival situation works. We’ve initiated an arrangement with the Documentary Film Institute (a.k.a. DocFilm) at SF State, and  we’ve hired one of their best graduate students in Cinema, Russ Kiel, out of Atlanta, who’s becoming known within the program as a valued cinematographer. Russ is charged with recording each video, working with sound correction and minimal editing, selecting brief video “highlights” from each program (clips anywhere from 30 seconds to 2 minutes), saving archive-quality uncompressed video files plus an MP4 version readied for streaming, preparing comparable audio files, and forwarding each finished program to our partners at DIVA — where some fifteen collections based at San Francisco State are housed and made publicly accessible online. Meanwhile in the background, Poetry Center staff are generating catalog notes on each program to accompany the new video and audio documents. We’ve been working with Kimberly Gomes, graduate student in Creative Writing, our Associate Director Elise Ficarra, and myself, to write and edit helpful and accurate notes: metadata. The video highlights, with descriptive captions, get posted at DocFilm’s Vimeo page (accessible in sequence at our Vimeo channel: Poetry Center Video Highlights) and are publicized via the Poetry Center Facebook page. The finished programs are posted, under the heading Current Season, at our dedicated online collection, Poetry Center Digital Archive.

As of November 22, just two months after our initial program went online, our first eight videos have been played 1,757 times. Just under 100 people have downloaded audio versions of these eight programs. I like the audio option: it’s a fairly unique aspect of our Digital Archive. Audio’s easy to play on earbuds or in the car, the files are small enough to keep, and — since for everything we post online we’ve secured Creative Commons Atrribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licensing — people can do pretty much what they like with the audio: remix it, play it on non-commercial radio, create animations, splice it into “mixtapes,” etc. As long as you don’t start charging anybody for it, the audio is free to use and re-use. So is the video: show it in classes, at parties, impress your friends.

A quick view of the first four of these eight programs, eight occasions:

  1. David Meltzer: September 24, 2015

     

    Brilliant anthologist, autodidact, jazz head, musician, teacher, poet, David Meltzer reads from and discusses the newly revised and reissued edition of his book Two-Way Mirror: A Poetry Notebook (City Lights Books, 2015), a kind of “book of books” culled from avid reading, mostly in the deep shelves of UC Berkeley’s Dow Library, from the days before they buried it under the landscape, when ordinary folks could still roam the stacks at will and stumble on the unfound. We also convinced him to read some poems from his early book Harps (Oyez, 1975), and David’s Copy: The Selected Poems of David Meltzer (ed. Michael Rothenberg, Penguin Poets, 2005). Clips include the opening and a later excerpt from Two-Way Mirror, and a reading of “Lamentation / for Jack Spicer,” an on-the-spot eulogy from 1965.

     

     

  2. Katy Bohinc and Paul Ebenkamp: October 1, 2015

    10-01-2015_Bohinc-Ebenkamp still

     

  3. Michael Gizzi’s Collected Poems, a Celebration: October 2, 2015

History Reimagined: The Story of Abina Mansah

abina_and_the_important_men

History is an infinite collection of truths that are known and truths that are hidden, destroyed, forgotten, silenced or ignored.  The modern day historian has the complicated task of setting the stage for society to understand the tales of our past that are well recounted as well as those that are missing.  And, while we cannot actually reach into the past and change it, we can restructure its meaning and shape by bringing forward true stories that were once left out.

History Professor Trevor Getz has done just that, authoring a graphic novel that tells the true story of Abina Mansah, a slave girl on Africa’s Gold Coast in the 1800’s who took her master to court for enslaving her.  Based on the transcripts of her actual trial, Abina and The Important Men, brings to center stage the tale of one young woman’s attempt to not only gain freedom but also justice in a very cruel world.

Abina did not win her case.  She wanted her voice to be heard but it was not…until now.   Now Abina’s story can be sounded across the world in the form of a book, a film and there is even going to be an app for that.  Abina did not realize the power of her actions at the time but her efforts paved the way for the world we have today.  Getz remarks, “The Abina project has always been about amplifying the voice of a young, enslaved, African woman who refused to quiet down in the face of systematic denigration.  Film allows us to bring her words and strength to a much larger audience.”

Getz’s novel has received much praise and was awarded the James Harvey Robinson prize from the American Historical Association.  Now, Getz has teamed with DocFilm and Yudu to breathe new life into this work by creating a sound and motion film of Abina’s story that will anchor a new app for history students across the country.  This innovative collaboration hopes to set a new trend in education.  By resurrecting Abina’s story via graphic novel, film and in a digital application, students can engage, interact and empathize with the story deeply and meaningfully.  This model creates a modern experience infused with essential lessons about personal biography, slavery, colonialism and the enlightenment.

Getz says, “The African great novelist and film-maker Sembene Ousmane said, years ago, that film is the medium of the people.  I like to think that making Abina’s story available in film will allow her story and words to reach an audience of people who can sympathize with and understand her experiences and their meaning.”

Created with the time and talent of San Francisco State University students, staff, faculty and support, Abina and The Important Men is also an example of the kind of bold thinking that distinguishes our university from the rest.  Slated for completion in early 2016, the Abina App will premiere in classrooms in the Fall of the same year.

written by, Soumyaa Behrens

 

trvorTrevor R. Getz is Professor of African History at San Francisco State University.  He has published in the fields of world history, the history of imperialism and colonialism, and heritage studies.  His principal focus is on the slavery and emancipation in nineteenth century West Africa.  His most recent book on this topic, Abina and the Important Men, won the James Harvey Robinson prize from the American Historical Association.  He edits the Oxford University Press African World Histories series and is currently working on a primer for teaching African History for Duke University Press as well as co-editing a collected work on slavery and emancipation in Ghana with Rebecca Shumway for Bloomsbury Press.